02/27/2018

Structural Flood Inspections 1 thru 10 of Residential and Commercial Structures in Response to Hurricane Harvey

Structural Flood Inspection Number: 1

Structural Flood Inspection Date: September 22, 2017

Reported Flood Event: Hurricane Harvery

City, State, and Zip Code of Flooded Propoerty: Crosby, TX 77532

Total Miles Traveled for Structural Inspection: 107 Miles

General Description of Structure and Property Owner’s Primary Concerns

The residential structure was a one-story, wood framed house supported on a slab on grade foundation. The exterior wall were covered with wooden siding panels. The main roof was gable in configuration and covered with asphalt shingles. The homeowner’s main concerns were the vertical drywall cracks between the rear exterior wall and interior wall as well as general drywall cracking in the walls and ceiling throughout the house. 

 

Structural Flood Inspection Number:  2

Structural Flood Inspection Date: September 22, 2017

Reported Flood Event: Hurricane Harvery

City, State, and Zip Code of Flooded Propoerty: Humble, TX 77338

Total Miles Traveled for Structural Inspection: 90 Miles

General Description of Structure and Property Owner’s Primary Concerns

The commercial structure was a one-story, steel-framed strip center supported on a slab on grade foundation. A short concrete retaining wall ran parallel to the rear elevation of the building. A concrete slab spanning the distance from the top of the wall to the rear elevation of the building sat on the retained fill behind the wall. The main roof consisted of a steel deck supported by steel bar joists. The property owner’s main concern was the condition of the retaining wall along the rear elevation of the building.

 

 

Structural Flood Inspection Number:  3

Structural Flood Inspection Date: September 22, 2017

Reported Flood Event: Hurricane Harvery

City, State, and Zip Code of Flooded Propoerty: Spring, TX 77380

Total Miles Traveled for Structural Inspection: 109 Miles

General Description of Structure and Property Owner’s Primary Concerns

The residential structure was a one-story, wood framed house supported on a slab on grade foundation. The exterior walls were covered with brick veneer on all four elevation. The main roof was gable in configuration and covered with asphalt shingles. The homeowner’s main concern was that the exterior wall sheathing had been damaged by the reported flood event at certain locations of the residence.

 

 

Structural Flood Inspection Number:  4

Structural Flood Inspection Date: September 25, 2017

Reported Flood Event: Hurricane Harvery

City, State, and Zip Code of Flooded Propoerty: Houston, TX 77044

Total Miles Traveled for Structural Inspection: 76 Miles

General Description of Structure and Property Owner’s Primary Concerns

The residential structure was a one-story, wood framed house supported on a slab on grade foundation. The exterior walls were covered with brick veneer on all four elevations. The main roof was hip in configuration and covered with asphalt shingles. The homeowner’s main concerns were the displaced brick veneer on the left elevation of the residence, the cracked brick veneer throughout the perimeter of the residence, and the cracked brick columns on the front elevation of the residence.

 

 

Structural Flood Inspection Number:  5

Structural Flood Inspection Date: September 25, 2017

Reported Flood Event: Hurricane Harvery

City, State, and Zip Code of Flooded Propoerty: Houston, TX 77079

Total Miles Traveled for Structural Inspection: 38 Miles

General Description of Structure and Property Owner’s Primary Concerns

The residential structure was a one-story, wood framed house supported on a slab on grade foundation. The exterior walls were covered with brick veneer on all four elevations. The main roof was gable in configuration and covered with asphalt shingles. The property owner’s main concerns were the lateral displacement of the rear exterior wall due to the expansion of the wood floors, the cracks in the brick veneer, and the condition of exterior wall sheathing.

 

 

Structural Flood Inspection Number:  6

Structural Flood Inspection Date: September 25, 2017

Reported Flood Event: Hurricane Harvery

City, State, and Zip Code of Flooded Propoerty: Houston, TX 77025

Total Miles Traveled for Structural Inspection: 43 Miles

General Description of Structure and Property Owner’s Primary Concerns

The residential structure was a one-story, wood framed house supported on a slab on grade foundation. The exterior walls were covered with wooden siding panels. The main roof was hip in configuration and covered with asphalt shingles. The property owner’s main concerns were the cracks in the slab on grade located at the interior of the house as well as cracks in the ceiling and upper wall finishes throughout the whole house.

 

 

Structural Flood Inspection Number:  7

Structural Flood Inspection Date: October 9, 2017

Reported Flood Event: Hurricane Harvery

City, State, and Zip Code of Flooded Propoerty: Houston, TX 77025

Total Miles Traveled for Structural Inspection: 43 Miles

General Description of Structure and Property Owner’s Primary Concerns

The residential structure was a one-story, wood framed house supported on a slab on grade foundation. The exterior walls were covered with wooden siding panel on all four elevations. The main roof was gable in configuration and covered with asphalt shingles. The property owner’s main concerns were the cracks in the wall and ceiling finishes throughout the house as well as the cracks in the concrete slab on grade of the detached garage.

 

 

Structural Flood Inspection Number:  8

Structural Flood Inspection Date: October 9, 2017

Reported Flood Event: Hurricane Harvery

City, State, and Zip Code of Flooded Propoerty: Friendswood, TX 77546

Total Miles Traveled for Structural Inspection: 78 Miles

General Description of Structure and Property Owner’s Primary Concerns

The residential structure was a one-story, wood framed house supported on a slab on grade foundation. The exterior walls were covered with brick veneer on all four elevations. The main roof was gable in configuration and covered with asphalt shingles. The property owner’s main concerns was that paper-faced exterior gypsum wall sheathing had been damaged throughout the house by the recent flood event.  

 

 

Structural Flood Inspection Number:  9

Structural Flood Inspection Date: October 9, 2017

Reported Flood Event: Hurricane Harvery

City, State, and Zip Code of Flooded Propoerty: Pasadena, TX 77505

Total Miles Traveled for Structural Inspection: 78 Miles

General Description of Structure and Property Owner’s Primary Concerns

The residential structure was a one-story, wood framed house supported on a slab on grade foundation. The exterior walls were covered with brick veneer on all four elevations. The main roof was hip in configuration and covered with asphalt shingles. The property owner’s main concerns were the deterioration of the wall studs and exterior wall sheathing throughout the house as well as the cracks on the slab on grade.

 

 

Structural Flood Inspection Number:  10

Structural Flood Inspection Date: October 16, 2017

Reported Flood Event: Hurricane Harvery

City, State, and Zip Code of Flooded Propoerty: Beaumont, TX 77713

Total Miles Traveled for Structural Inspection: 234 Miles

General Description of Structure and Property Owner’s Primary Concerns

The residential structure was a one-story, wood framed house supported on a slab on grade foundation. The exterior walls were covered with brick veneer on all four elevations. The main roof was gable in configuration and covered with asphalt shingles. The property owner’s main concerns were the cracks in the brick veneer on the right elevation.

 

Structural Inspection Process

I, Abdul Siraj PE, was requested to conduct structural forensic engineering studies of the residential and commercial structures listed above. I physically inspected the properties on the dates referenced above in order to determine: extent of pre-existing damage, extent of damage caused by hydrostatic and/or hydrodynamic forces associated with the reported flood event, and the extent of damage caused by other sources.  My structural assessments consisted of the following tasks:

 

Conducted an interview with each property owner to establish a timeline of the damage and identify their structural concerns

 

Visually observed, documented, and photographed the portions of the structures which were affected by the reported flood event.

 

Studied the available weather information, weather conditions and other relevant data to understand the cause of the reported flood event.

 

Evaluated the information obtained from each structural inspection in order to identify: damage due to hydrostatic forces or buoyancy, damage due to hydrodynamic forces, damage due to impact of flood-borne debris, evidence of scour and/or erosion due to the velocity of the moving floodwater, and evidence of soil settlement either due to the recent exposure to floodwater or to long-term consolidation.

 

Prepared a structural forensic engineering report summarizing my observations, evaluations, conclusions, and recommendations for each property.

 

If you need any structural engineering assistance, please contact us at info@engineeringexamples.net.

12/29/2017

A Summary of the “Geotechnical Depth Practice Exams for the Civil PE Exam, First Edition”

In this post, I will provide a brief description of each question that is found in the “Geotechnical Depth Practice Exams for the Civil PE Exam”, First Edition. This book is published by PPI and contains two full length 40-problem, multiple-choice exams covering the geotechnical depth portion of the Civil PE Exam. I will first cover the 40 questions in the first practice PE Exam, and then cover the 40 questions in the second practice PE Exam.

 

 

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Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam 1

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 1

In the first question, a table of correction factors is given for a standard penetration test (SPT) performed using a split-spoon sampler. We are told the number of blows needed to drive the sampler the first, second, and third 6 inch increments. We are asked to find the normalized standard penetration resistance based on the given table of correction factors.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 2

In the second question, the in situ moisture content and unit weight of a soil sample is obtained through a modified California ring sampler. We are given the average mass of a single ring,average diameter of a single ring, average height of a single ring, and moisture content of the sample.  We are asked to compute the dry unit weight of the soil.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 3

In the third question, Atterberg limits and particle size distribution from a sieve analysis are presented for a given soil sample. We are asked to classify this soil according to the Unified Soil Classification System (USCS).

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 4

In the fourth question, a description is given for an excavation prone to rockslides. We are told that the rock material is fragmented and has a relatively low density, and we are asked to determine if the rock type in the excavation is sedimentary, metamorphic, or igneous.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 5

In the fifth question, a four-story office building is proposed to be built on a site where the site developer does not plan on making any improvements to the existing soil. The test boring record of the soil along with the anticipated building dead and live loads are given. We are to determine what type of foundation is structurally and economically most suitable: mat and pedestal, thickened slab on grade, continuous spread footings, or drilled cast-in-place concrete piles.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 6

The sixth questions asks what field observations and soil sampling characteristics must be obtained to evaluate the seepage condition of the embankment for an earth dam at a fishery where there is excessive seepage along the downstream face and at the edge of the embankment.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 7

The seventh question focuses on calculating the ground surface settlement due to a pile of brick and concrete debris placed on a saturated clay layer.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 8

The eighth question provides the wet mass, dry mass, specific gravity, and degree of saturation for a clay sample. We need to calculate the void ratio of the clay.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 9

In the ninth question, we are told in situ dry unit weight a saturated sandy clay soil sample. We are also given the specific gravity of solids and the liquid limit (LL). We need to find the difference between the water content of the saturated sample and the LL of the soil on a percent solids basis.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 10

The tenth question is related to determining a soil sample’s maximum water content without swelling or bleeding given its specific gravity, weight, volume, and dry weight.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 11

The eleventh question presents a soil profile consisting of 3 layers and 2 different types of soil. We are asked to find the effective stress at the midpoint of the sandy clay layer which is the bottom layer.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 12

The twelfth question focuses on computing the coefficient of permeability of a soil sample.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 13

In the thirteenth question, an unconfined compressive strength test is performed on a concrete cylindrical sample. The axial load at failure is recorded, and we are asked to find the shear strength of the concrete.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 14

In the fourteenth question, the failure plane angle and deviator stress are given for a cohesionless sand sample. We need to compute the effective shear stress on the failure plane.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 15

The fifteenth question focuses on computing the coefficient of permeability of a circular soil sample undergoing a constant-head permeability test.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 16

In the sixteenth question, the water level of a reservoir is proposed to be increased by 10 feet. We are asked to determine the change in effective stress of soil due to the rise in the water level.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 17

The seventeenth question related to determining the pore pressure at the base of the top layer of soil experiencing steady-state vertical seepage.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 18

The eighteenth question deals with calculating the change in total stress at a certain depth below the ground surface using the Boussinesq contours for pressure distribution given a load-bearing area. 

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 19

The nineteenth question asks us to find the overturning moment about the toe of a cantilever retaining wall that is subjected to a concentrated surcharge load.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 20

The twentieth question asks us to compute the active soil pressure resultant on a semigravity retaining wall using the Coulomb equation.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 21

The twenty-first question deals with determining the time required for the bottom clay layer of a given soil profile to achieve a certain percentage of consolidation.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 22

The twenty-second question relates to finding the amount of borrow material required to fill an embankment based on a specified dry unit weight and optimum moisture content. The in situ conditions including the moisture content as a percentage, wet density in lbs per cubic feet, specific gravity, liquid limit, plasticity index, and USCS classification.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 23

In the twenty-third question, we are asked to calculate the increase in fill layer thickness of a dry soil with a given swell potential in the event that the soil is saturated when placed as supporting soil underneath a spread footing foundation.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 24

In the twenty-fourth question, the cross section of a concrete dike is shown with a certain depth of water on one side of the dike. We are asked to compute the seepage rate per foot of dike width given the coefficient of permeability.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 25

In the twenty-fifth question, a 30 feet by 30 feet mat foundation experiences a uniform loading of 2700 lbs/ft^2. The mat foundation is supported by a soil profile consisting of a silty sand layer on top and a clay layer beneath the silty sand layer. We need to determine the consolidation settlement of the foundation given that the normally consolidated clay layer and the groundwater location remain constant.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 26

In the twenty-sixth question, a water supply tower is located in a seismically active zone. We are told the spectral acceleration and the base shear of the tower, and we need to find the total weight of the tower.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 27

In the twenty-seventh question, a sign with a given weight is supported on top of 2 long metal poles. We know the length of the poles, the moment of inertia of the poles about their centroid, and the modulus of elasticity of the pole material. We are asked to calculate the natural period of vibration of the structure assuming that the weight of each pole is negligible.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 28

In the twenty-eighth question, we are shown the cross-section of a soil profile consisting of three layers. The top two layers are poorly graded sand, and the bottom layer is clayey sand. Using standard atmospheric pressure, we are asked to compute the cyclic resistance ratio at a certain depth below the ground surface that would result from an earthquake of a given magnitude.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 29

In the twenty-ninth question, we are told that a stormwater drainage line in the form a flexible pipe with a given diameter is to be installed at the base of an embankment of specified thickness. The embankment soil is to be compacted to a specified unit weight, and we need to find the dead load on the buried pipe.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 30

The thirtieth question is concerned with how to calculate the cohesive factor of safety of a submerged slope with a given moisture content using the Taylor method.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 31

The thirty-first question deals with the computation of the net bearing capacity of a continuous footing using the Terzaghi-Meyerhof equation and Terzaghi bearing capacity factors.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 32

In the thirty-second question, an earth dam retains a certain level of water of one side and is underlain by impervious rock. We are asked to compute the seepage rate per foot of dam width given the coefficient of permeability for the earth dam material.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 33

In the thirty-third question, a concrete pipe of given diameter is buried in a trench at a specified depth below the ground surface. The density of the sand used to backfill the trench, the factor of safety, and the bedding class are given, and we need to find the maximum live load that can be applied at the top of the pipe.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 34

In the thirty-fourth question, the cross-section of a potentially liquefiable soil profile consisting of three layers is shown. The top two layers are sand, and the bottom layer is clayey sand. Given the results of a corrected standard penetration test (SPT) at six inch intervals, we are asked to compute the cyclic resistance ratio at a certain depth below the ground surface that would result from an earthquake of a given magnitude.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 35

In the thirty-fifth question, the foundation of a distribution facility consists of a 4 inch thick concrete slab supported by circular interior spread footings that must support a certain structural dead-plus-live load of the interior columns. Assuming that the column loading is concentric and the self-weight of the footing is negligible, we need to find the factor of safety of the given live load with respect to the ultimate bearing capacity using the Terzaghi  bearing capacity factors.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 36

The thirty-sixth question deals with the computation of the ultimate bearing capacity of a rectangular footing using the Terzaghi-Meyerhof equation and Meyerhof bearing capacity factors. We are given the following soil parameters: dry unit weight, internal angle of friction, cohesion, water content above water table, and water content below water table.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 37

The thirty-seventy question is focused on how to calculate the cohesive factor of safety of a slope using the Taylor method.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 38

In the thirty-eighth question, we are told that a certain amount of sandy clay soil in placed in a container with a given mass. We know the wet mass plus container and the dry mass plus container, and we to determine the water content of the sample.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 39

The thirty-ninth question deals with identifying the potential Richter magnitude of an earthquake for an active fault of specified length.

 

Geotechnical Depth PE Practice Exam Question 40

The fortieth question is concerned with calculating the expected settlement of a structure that is to be supported on a raft foundation with below-grade walls.

12/19/2017

October 2017 SE Exam Results for the Structural Engineering Exam

In this post, I will provide a detailed analysis of the October 2017 SE Exam results. The raw data is courtesy of the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES) website. Before diving further into the data, let’s take a look at some basic statistics:

 

The chart below shows the Number of First Time and Repeat Takers by Subject of the October 2017 SE Exam

 

 

Based on the chart above, we find:

 

SE Exam with highest number of first time takers – 301, SE Vertical Forces Buildings

SE Exam with lowest number of first time takers – 51, SE Lateral Forces Bridges 

SE Exam with highest number of repeat takers – 227, SE Lateral Forces Buildings

SE Exam with lowest number of repeat takers – 16, SE Vertical Forces Bridges

 

The following chart presents the October 2017 SE Exam pass rates for first time takers

 

 

Based on the chart above, we find:

 

Average pass rate for first time takers – 41%

SE Exam with highest pass rate for first time takers – 58%, SE Vertical Forces Bridges

SE Exam with lowest pass rate for first time takers – 25%, SE Lateral Forces Bridges

 

The following chart presents the October 2017 SE Exam pass rates for repeat takers

 

 

Based on the chart above, we find:

 

Average pass rate for repeat takers – 29%

SE Exam with highest pass rate for repeat takers – 39%, SE Lateral Forces Bridges

SE Exam with lowest pass rate for repeat takers – 12%, SE Vertical Forces Bridges

12/18/2017

October 2017 PE Exam Results for the Professional Engineering Exam

In this post, I will provide a detailed analysis of the October 2017 PE Exam results. The raw data is courtesy of the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES) website. For some subjects, the NCEES website does not provide the October 2017 results but does provide the April 2017 results, and they have been appropriately noted below. Before diving further into the data, let’s take a look at some basic statistics:

 

Total number of first time takers – 10,832

Total number of repeat takers – 4,865

 

The chart below shows the Number of First Time and Repeat Takers by Subject of the October 2017 PE Exam

 

 

Based on the chart above, we find:

 

PE Exam with highest number of first time takers – 1,736, Civil Structural

PE Exam with lowest number of first time takers – 15, Software (April 2017)

PE Exam with highest number of repeat takers – 959, Civil Transportation

PE Exam with lowest number of repeat takers – 5, Software (April 2017)

 

The following chart presents the October 2017 PE Exam pass rates for first time takers

 

 

Based on the chart above, we find:

 

Average pass rate for first time takers – 69%

PE Exam with highest pass rate for first time takers – 82%, PE Electrical and Computer: Computer Engineering

PE Exam with lowest pass rate for first time takers – 60%, PE Mining and Mineral Processing

 

The following chart presents the October 2017 PE Exam pass rates for repeat takers

 

 

Based on the chart above, we find:

 

Average pass rate for repeat takers – 39%

PE Exam with highest pass rate for repeat takers – 60%, PE Mining and Mineral Processing

PE Exam with lowest pass rate for repeat takers – 12%, PE Electronics, Controls, and Communications

12/15/2017

Engineering Design Codes and Standards Required for the Civil PE Exam in April 2018

In this post, I will outline the engineering design codes and standards that you will need if you are taking the Civil PE (Professional Engineering) Exam in April 2018. The Civil PE Exam has 5 different depth sections: construction, geotechnical, structural, transportation, and water resources and environmental. I will list the design codes and standards needed for each exam based on the information provided on the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES) website at the time of this post

 

Civil Breadth and Construction Depth PE Exam

 

ASCE 37 Design Loads on Structures During Construction, 2014, American Society of Civil Engineers, Reston, VA, www.asce.org

 

CMWB Standard Practice for Bracing Masonry Walls Under Construction, 2012, Council for Masonry Wall Bracing, Mason Contractors Association of America, Lombard, IL, www.masoncontractors.org

 

AISC Steel Construction Manual, 14th ed., 2011, Parts 1–3, 8, 16.1 (Chapters M, N) and 16.2, American Institute of Steel Construction,Inc., Chicago, IL, www.aisc.org.

 

ACI MNL-15 Field Reference Manual, 2016, American Concrete Institute, Farmington Hills, MI, www.concrete.org.

 

ACI 347R Guide to Formwork for Concrete, 2014, American Concrete Institute, Farmington Hills, MI, www.concrete.org (in ACI SP-4, 8th edition appendix)

 

ACI SP-4 Formwork for Concrete, 8th ed., 2014, American Concrete Institute, Farmington Hills, MI, www.concrete.org

 

OSHA Construction Industry Regulations: 29 CFR Parts 1903, 1904, and 1926 (US federal version, January 2017), US Department of Labor, Washington, DC

 

MUTCD-Pt 6 Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices—Part 6 Temporary Traffic Control, 2009, US Federal Highway Administration, www.fhwa.dot.gov

 

Civil Breadth and Geotechnical Depth PE Exam

 

ASCE 7 Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures, 2010, American Society of Civil Engineers, Reston, VA

 

OSHA 29 CFR Part 1926, Safety and Health Regulations for Construction, US Department of Labor, Washington, DC. US federal version

Subpart P, Excavations, Part 1926.651: Specific Excavation Requirements
Subpart P, Excavations, Part 1926.652: Requirements for Protective Systems

 

Civil Breadth and Structural Depth PE Exam

 

AASHTO AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications, 7th edition (without interims), American Association of State Highway & Transportation Officials, Washington, DC.

 

IBC International Building Code, 2015 edition (without supplements), International Code Council, Falls Church, VA.

 

ASCE 7 Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures, 2010, 3rd printing, American Society of Civil Engineers, Reston, VA

 

ACI 318 Building Code Requirements for Structural Concrete, 2014, American Concrete Institute, Farmington Hills, MI

 

AISC Steel Construction Manual, 14th edition, American Institute of Steel Construction, Inc., Chicago, IL

 

NDS National Design Specification for Wood Construction ASD/LRFD, 2015 edition, and National Design Specification Supplement, Design Values for Wood Construction, 2015 edition, American Forest & Paper Association, Washington, DC

 

OSHA CFR 29 Part 1910 General Industry regulations and Construction regulations, 2016 Occupational Safety and Health Standards

Subpart A, General, 1910.1–1910.9, with Appendix A to 1910.7

Subpart D, Walking-Working Surfaces, 1910.21–1910.30

Subpart F, Powered Platforms, Manlifts, and Vehicle-Mounted Work Platforms, 1910.66–1910.68, with Appendix A–Appendix D to 1910.66

 

OSHA CFR 29 Part 1926 Safety and Health Regulations for Construction

Subpart E, Personal Protective and Life Saving Equipment, 1926.95–1926.107

Subpart M, Fall Protection, 1926.500–1926.503, Appendix A–Appendix E

Subpart Q, Concrete and Masonry Construction, 1926.700–1926.706, with Appendix A

Subpart R, Steel Erection, 1926.750–1926.761, with Appendix A–Appendix H

 

PCI Design Handbook: Precast and Prestressed Concrete, 7th edition, 2010, Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute, Chicago, IL

 

TMS 402/6024 (ACI 530/530.1) Building Code Requirements and Specifications for Masonry Structures (and related commentaries), 2013; The Masonry Society, Boulder, CO; American Concrete Institute, Detroit, MI; and Structural Engineering Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers, Reston, VA

 

Civil Breadth and Transportation Depth PE Exam

 

AASHTO A Policy on Geometric Design of Highways and Streets, 6th edition, 2011 (including November 2013 errata), American Association of State Highway & Transportation Officials, Washington, DC

 

AASHTO Guide for Design of Pavement Structures (GDPS-4-M), 1993, and 1998 supplement, American Association of State Highway & Transportation Officials, Washington, DC

 

AASHTO Roadside Design Guide, 4th edition, 2011 (including February 2012 and July 2015 errata), American Association of State Highway & Transportation Officials, Washington, DC

 

AASHTO Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide: A Manual of Practice, interim edition, July 2008, American Association of State Highway & Transportation Officials, Washington, DC

 

AASHTO Guide for the Planning, Design, and Operation of Pedestrian Facilities, 1st edition, 2004, American Association of State Highway & Transportation Officials, Washington, DC

 

AASHTO Highway Safety Manual, 1st ed., 2010, vols. 1–3 (including September 2010, February 2012, and March 2016 errata), American Association of State Highway & Transportation Officials, Washington, DC

 

AI The Asphalt Handbook (MS-4), 7th edition, 2007, Asphalt Institute, Lexington, KY

 

HCM Highway Capacity Manual 2010, vols. 1–3, Transportation Research Board— National Research Council, Washington, DC. This includes the following:

Approved HCM 2010 Corrections and Clarifications (as of January 2014)

Approved HCM 2010 Interpretations (as of January 2014) \

Replacement HCM 2010 Volume 1–3 pages (April 2014)

Replacement HCM 2010 Volume 1–3 pages (January 12–February 13)

Replacement HCM 2010 Volume 1–3 pages (March 2013)

 

MUTCD Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, 2009, including Revisions 1 and 2 dated May 2012, U.S. Department of Transportation—Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC

 

PCA Design and Control of Concrete Mixtures, 16th edition, 2016, Portland Cement Association, Skokie, IL

 

FHWA Hydraulic Design of Highway Culverts, Hydraulic Design Series Number 5, Publication No. FHWA-HIF-12-026, 3rd edition, April 2012, U.S. Department of Transportation—Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC

 

Civil Breadth and Water Resources and Environmental Depth PE Exam

 

No Design Codes / Standards are required for this exam